Flip Cookbook

Girl geek foodies making healthy cooking fun and easy.

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Sugar Free Sunday & Coconut Palm Sugar

Welcome to one of the sweetest weekly virtual potluck get-together ever! We host Sugar Free Sunday every week to exchange incredible sugar free recipes to inspire everyone to start the week right!

Let’s talk about coconut sugar today. Recently I’ve been seeing it in a lot of “health-ier” baked goods instead of the regular refined sugar or even the dubious evaporated cane juice.

Coconut sugar, also known as coconut palm sugar is made from the sap of flowers from the coconut palm tree. Basically the sap is boiled or dried down into a crystal or paste form which is sold in markets. In the US, I’ve typically seen it sold in crystal form. It looks very similar to brown sugar in fact.

Peaking behind the scenes though is a different story.

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Mattar Paneer

I generally follow the rule of moderation, except of course for sugar which I have banished from my household after it caused such massive grief. But paneer is one of my vices. I could eat a block of paneer with salt and pepper in a single sitting. Maybe with a little cayenne pepper to add a little kick. I really could. For those who are scratching their heads, paneer is the absolute best part of milk. You start with super fatty whole milk. And then you curdle it to separate the milk solids (aka – milk fats) from the watery liquid. THEN, you proceed to drip out the last remaining bits of liquid because really, it just gets in the way of the good stuff. THAT my friends is paneer. Pure, unadulterated milk fats. Yum.

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Sugar Free Sunday & Good Pr New York

Welcome to one of the sweetest weekly virtual potluck get-together ever! We host Sugar Free Sunday every week to exchange incredible sugar free recipes to inspire everyone to start the week right!

Recently New York City announced an initiative to reduce the amount of soda that it’s citizen drink. It seems that NYC have been trying to make their citizens aware of the impact of sugary soda for a few years now. I wanted to share with you posters that the Health Department Put in subways a couple of years ago.

Keep up the good fight NY!

How do you participate in the virtual potluck?

  • Link your recipe post (NOT your homepage) if it does not use refined sugar. Your blog does not have to be entirely sugar free, just the dish you’re sharing!
  • Please link back to this get-together somewhere in your post’s text. It’s a great way to invite your readers to the fun!
  • Sign up for free to our new venture Velvet Aroma. It’s a visual way to read the blogs you love and really bring their recipes into your kitchen.
  • See all the details on our Sugar Free Sunday page.

We’re so excited to see what you’re cooking….. Sugar Free!

Click on the ‘Add your link’ button below to share.



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Sugar Free Sunday & Honey In Our Blood

Welcome to one of the sweetest weekly virtual potluck get-together ever! We host Sugar Free Sunday every week to exchange incredible sugar free recipes to inspire everyone to start the week right!

I’ve recently met a few people who have challenged my honey consumption. The argument that is given is that honey, much like refined sugar, spikes your blood sugar levels. This in turn, as we’ve discussed, causes a spike in insulin production by our liver, which in turn could lead to serious health issues like diabetes.

Being scientific and always looking to improve myself, I decided to do some research. Here is what I found:

According to American Diabetes Association:

Raw, unprocessed honey is packed with antioxidants, minerals, vitamins, amino acids, enzymes, carbohydrates and phytonutrients. However, processed honey is stripped of these nutrients and no better than white table sugar, so be sure to read labels when shopping for honey. Some types of honey, such as red clover honey or orange blossom honey, have a lower glycemic index. That is, they dissolve more slowly into the bloodstream and have less effect on blood sugar levels.

According to the Mayo Clinc:

Generally, there’s no advantage to substituting honey for sugar in a diabetes eating plan. Both honey and sugar will affect your blood sugar level

The glycemic index (GI) of honey is roughly 55 while that of table sugar is about 68. Generally a GI of 55 or lower is considered to be low and 70 and above is considered high. In that regard it seems honey is better. However Potatoe chips have a GI of 54 — so I’m not entirely sure if 55 should be considered low at all. Source: Nutrition Data. There are other studies that quote the GI of honey as high as 74!

However according to this Australian Government study, raw honey’s GI can be as low as 31 — which is really low.

So I suppose if you’re turning away from table sugar because of the spikes it causes in your insulin levels, then honey may not be a safe bet. It’s important to consider the variety and also to stick with raw honey instead of processed honey.

How do you participate in the virtual potluck?

  • Link your recipe post (NOT your homepage) if it does not use refined sugar. Your blog does not have to be entirely sugar free, just the dish you’re sharing!
  • Please link back to this get-together somewhere in your post’s text. It’s a great way to invite your readers to the fun!
  • Sign up for free to our new venture Velvet Aroma. It’s a visual way to read the blogs you love and really bring their recipes into your kitchen.
  • See all the details on our Sugar Free Sunday page.

We’re so excited to see what you’re cooking….. Sugar Free!

Click on the ‘Add your link’ button below to share