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Misal (Mixed Sprouted Beans) With Yogurt

You know what the best part of the weekend is? Yup, brunch.

Throughout the week I’m rushing to get out the door in the mornings.. so pretty much whatever I eat ends up fitting into a small bowl. Oh and the drink typically in a thermos to go. So when the weekend rolls around, I try to have a truly indulgent morning. Which means I (or in this case, my mom who is visiting) take time to make and eat some pretty outrageous breakfasts. Which I suppose means you can no longer call them “breakfast” but instead give them the ultimate name “brunch”.

Now, I know you’re reading this, looking at the picture above and saying – “Um.. Raj.. Are you writing about a different recipe post.. cuz that does’t look like brunch at all.” LOL. I know, I know, it’s not the typical brunch around the world. But in India – having Misal with yogurt for brunch is not only typical but also evokes the same joy and happiness a stack of pancakes does for most Americans.

So what is “Misal”? Misal literally means “mixture”. It’s a really popular dish in the state of Maharashtra, India. Generally it’s eaten in the morning or as a snack. As you can imagine, it’s super nutritious and comparatively cheap because of the fact that it’s made with a mixture of sprouted beans.

It does have a long prep time because you have to soak and sprouts the beans. So you do have to plan ahead if you don’t want to use beans out of a can. Basically if you soak the beans Friday night, you can have this amazing dish for Sunday breakfast. YUM YUM YUM.

The sev and tamrind-date chutney garnishing really makes a big difference. It takes the dish from tasting “healthy” to tasting like you’re really treating yourself (even though it’s still healthy). So I suggest you head over to the closest India grocery store and make sure you buy the toppings.

Enjoy!!

Misal (Mixed Sprouted Beans) With Yogurt

Makes: 6 servings
Prep Time: 30 – 36 hours of soaking & sprouting of dried beans
Cook Time: 20 – 30 minutes
Ready in: 45 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup of dry Moth Beans
  • 1/2 cup of dry Mung Beans
  • 1/4 cup of dry Blackeye Beans
  • 1/4 cup of dry brown lentils
  • 1/4 cup red kidney beans
  • Water for soaking and cooking
  • 2 green chilies (serrano pepper) cut in half lengthwise or 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 4 – 6 curry leaves
  • 1 tablespoon peeled and chopped ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera)
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds (rai)
  • 1/4 teaspoon asafetida powder (hing)
  • 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder (haldi)
  • 1/2 teaspoon garam masala powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon tamarind paste
  • 2 tablespoon organic canola oil
  • 2 teaspoons salt (to taste)

For Garnishing:

  • Handful of chopped fresh coriander leaves
  • 1/2 cup chopped onions (I used red onions)
  • Yogurt
  • 1/2 cup sev (optional — available in an Indian store)
  • dates & tamrind chutney (available in an Indian store)

Directions

1. Put all beans in a mixing bowl. Cover it with room temperature water (enough so that the beans have are submerged below 2 inches of water). Let it soak for about 6 – 8 hours. I soaked it in the morning so that it was ready to start sprouting in the evening. Drain the water, cover and put the bowl in a warm place. I put it in the oven with the light on. Let the beans sprout. I let it sprout for one day. (from one night to dinner the next night)

2. Rinse the sprouted beans. Over medium high heat, heat the oil in a pressure cooker. You can test the oil to see if it’s ready for the tempering by dropping a couple of cumin seeds and see if they sizzle. Once it’s ready add the mustard seeds and cumin seeds. Allow them to pop for a few seconds. Then add curry leaves, ginger, green chilies. Then add asafetida and turmeric powder. If you don’t have a pressure cooker – you can do the tempering in a pan.

3. Add the sprouted beans to the pan and mix. After about 5 minutes add about 1 cup of water to make the gravy. Add the tamarind paste, garam masala, salt. Mix. Seal the pressure cooker and allow it to cook till one whistle goes off. If you don’t have a pressure cooker, use a slow cooker or just cover the pot and simmer till beans are tender.

4. Serve garnished with coriander leaves, yogurt, onions and sev.

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6 Responses to Misal (Mixed Sprouted Beans) With Yogurt

  1. I’m a big fan of step-by-step photos!

    I love how you made sprouting beans look so easy! I have tried before and they took three days to sprout and despite changing the water often they were a little “too” stinky to cook! I want to try your oven method – if it only takes a day to get them to sprout, I can do that!!

    Ciao,

    L

    • Raj says:

      Hmm.. Okay so I have a couple of tricks (taught to me by my mom) that might help:

      After the initial overnight (or 8 hour) soak:
      1. You don’t want to keep it in water anymore
      2. You do want to keep the beans in an airy container.. Like a colandar.
      3. You should keep the beans in a warm place. I stuck it in the oven with the light on cuz it’s an easy trick I learned while on SCD πŸ™‚ and mostly works. If that isn’t working you might want to get a cheese cloth and tie the beans in that.. that way the warmth generated by the beans while they sprout can be used to keep the beans warm. Love how that works out.

      Do let me know how it goes for you.

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  3. Sonia says:

    I bow down to thee! We’re in Misal heaven tonight!! πŸ™‚

    Although I’ve cooked Misal at least a dozen times, this by far beats all those attempts… We all know where this recipe will go… in my Velvet Aroma “Absolute favorites – Never disappoints” cookbook! πŸ™‚

  4. Beatrice says:

    Can you use any kind of bean to make this dish?

    • Raj says:

      I generally use those that I’ve listed above in the recipe. However, if I’m missing one (or even more.. ) I do substitute with more of the others. πŸ™‚ It always turns out delicious. Which bean are you thinking of using?

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